Thanksgiving Food Photography Tips- Creating a Video Slideshow Worthy Shot

Food photography is all the rage lately. People love snapping photos of their delicious meals at restaurants and bakeries. Don’t limit your fun to only foods others prepare. Thanksgiving can be a fun time to show off your plate and tell the world what tasty treats you can make.

Food photography is an art form, but even the novice can take some amazing shots. Here are some tips for taking great food photos. Start snapping those shots and see what you can capture and then use a video slideshow maker to create a mouthwatering slideshow.

Contrast with the Plate

Choosing a plate carefully can have a big impact on your photo. White plates work best for dark foods while darker plates accent lighter options. Even a bold, patterned plate can look great as long as the food display is simple.

Use Props

That gorgeous turkey looks great on its own, but it might look even better paired with a few simple props. Add a few stalks of celery or some fresh onions  and carrots around the pan. Show the progression from raw to cooked by taking photos as the meal is prepared.

Wipe, Wipe, Wipe

Clean plates are essential for good food photography. Keep a clean rag handy and wipe plates as the food is placed on them. Remove drips, spills and even fingerprints.

Change the Angle

Take photos from every angle: above, below and to the side. Take lots of shots and try different things. Experimentation often leads to the best photos.

Don’t Forget the Family

During the holidays you’re sure to have lots of family around. Add them to your photos when you can. Sure, that cookie looks delicious, but think how it might look in Cousin Andy’s hand. People can make great props too.

Yum, yum, yum! Capture the savory goodness of your Thanksgiving meal this year with some stunning photos. We can’t wait to stumble across your food photography slideshow on YouTube or Vimeo!

 

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